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More Yardage Without Buying a New Driver

More Yardage Without Buying a New Driver

By: Brad Kirkman

In this day and age it seems like you have to get a loan to buy a new driver, and with every season a new one needs to be purchased or you have been left behind. What if I told you that it is possible to gain up to 23 more yards of carry with your current driver — would you be interested?

Increase Yardage by Changing Angle of Attack

The average male amateur golfer swings the driver at approximately 93 mph. For an example, let’s say that you swing your driver at 90 mph. We all know that if you make good solid contact in the center of the club, with a good clubhead path, and a good clubface angle, you have your best chance of success. However, we need to include one vital piece of information: angle of approach.

If you hit your driver with a descending angle of approach of -5, you will carry the ball approximately 191 yards. If you hit the ball with an ascending angle of approach of +5, with the same swing speed, the ball carries approximately 214 yards. That’s a 23-yard difference, and we are not including roll out.

Determining Your Attack Angle

The next question is, how do you know if you are hitting down on the ball or hitting it with an ascending blow? A high-end launch monitor can give you that information, but if you do not have access to that technology, here is a quick test for you. Place a ball on the ground about four inches directly in front of your teed up ball toward the target. Can you hit the ball on the tee and miss the ball lying on the ground? If so, you’re on the right track. If not, you’re giving up lots of yardage with your driver.

My suggestion is to find a qualified professional to assist you in the quest for a positive angle of approach with your driver. You could add 20+ yards to your drives without a new driver and sometimes this can be accomplished with a simple change in your set-up. Of course, with a new driver it may go even further.

Brad Kirkman is a PGA Master Professional and National Dean of Golf Instruction and Golf Technology at Golf Academy of America.